The world’s newest country is also among the most fragile and troubled. The jubilation of independence in 2011 quickly soured when a personal feud between President Salva Kiir and Vice President Riek Machar took an ethnic line and pit the two dominant tribes in the country against each other. Machar accuses the president of being a dictator; Kiir accuses Riek of treason. The result has been gross violations of human rights, which some describe as ethnic cleansing. Worse, the conflict is merging with the civil war in Sudan, which has paved the way for the Islamist government of Omar al-Bashir to indiscriminately attack Christians in the border region.

 

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Ten killed as Christian college attacked in South Sudan

Residential accommodation at Emmanuel Christian Training Centre in Goli, South Sudan. (Photo: Open Doors International, 2009)

At least ten people, including five children, have been killed in an attack on a college in South Sudan teaching Theology, Education and Business, according to the Christian charity Open Doors International. Three guards and five students – one secondary and four primary school pupils – were among the victims […]

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South Sudan’s fragile peace deal still threatens famine

South Sudan’s fragile peace deal still threatens famine

Three years after gaining independence, the rebel movement that propelled South Sudan into statehood has degenerated into ethnic bloodletting verging on civil war. South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir has agreed to form an interim government with his political adversary, Riek Machar following pressure from the United Nations Secretary General Ban […]

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Amnesty wants Sudanese pastors freed

Amnesty International has called for the release of two Presbyterian Church leaders in South Sudan, who were arrested on May 19. Rev. Idris Nalos Kida and Pastor Trainee David Gayin were not allowed access to a lawyer or their families, and are at risk of torture or other forms of […]

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Sudan loses ‘bright young leader’

Joseph Taban Lusaba, principal of New Bishop Gwynne College (of the Episcopal Church of Sudan, ECS) in Juba, South Sudan, died May 20 after an illness. Before studying for a masters at Duke University in the United States in 2010, Joseph Taban had been a priest at ECS’ All Saints […]

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