Tunisia’s religious freedom curbed by societal pressure – UN Rapporteur

The Malik ibn Anas Mosque in Carthage, near the capital Tunis. (Photo: World Watch Monitor)
Old laws and societal pressure pose the greatest challenges to religious freedom in Tunisia, concluded the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief, Ahmed Shaheed, after a ten-day visit. Though Tunisia’s 2014 Constitution guarantees religious freedom, there is still work to be done to align its laws and . . . Read More

5 years on: what has the Arab Spring meant for Christians?

5 years on: what has the Arab Spring meant for Christians?
The Arab Spring, which began five years ago today (17th December) started with a wave of protests in Tunisia followed by other Arab countries. It was positively acclaimed as a social movement demanding an end to human rights violations, government corruption and poverty. Yet, so far, the outcome is largely contrary to . . . Read More

Freedom of religion an issue ‘whose time has come’

Freedom of religion an issue ‘whose time has come’
Freedom of religion and belief is an issue “whose time has come”, the vice chairwoman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom said yesterday. During the presentation of two reports on religious freedom at the European Parliament in Brussels on Feb. 12, commission Vice Chairwoman Katrina Lantos Swett said . . . Read More

Tunisian constitution finds no place for Sharia

Tunisian constitution finds no place for Sharia
Al-Zaytuna Mosque, Tunis.Christopher Rose / Flickr / Creative Commons Three years after the so-called ‘Arab Spring’ started in Tunisia, the country’s National Constituent Assembly is close to passing a new constitution which rejects Islam as the “main source of law”, but states it is the State’s duty to “protect the . . . Read More

Tunisian Islamic hardliners ascendant

Hamadi Jebali’s resignation as Tunisia’s prime minister has opened the door to Islamist hardliners in his Ennahda party to pick his successor. Jebali had wanted to form a government of non-partisan technocrats, but the plan has been stoutly opposed by Islamists who control the interior, justice and foreign ministries, and . . . Read More